031–EHT–Double Edged Sword of Loyalty

 

 

The Double Edge Sword of Loyalty

  • There are bad leaders out there, no doubt

 

  • “Management reserves the right to manage poorly”

 What you should expect:

  • Fair & consistent treatment

 

  • Genuine concern for your wellbeing & development

 

  • The tools & support you need to do your job

 

  • To be challenged and to be made to demonstrate your proficiency

 

What your leaders should expect

  • For you to do your job (Mark Von Alpen Fully Involved)

 

  • For you to be engaged in the organization

 

  • For you to respect our craft & our profession

 

  • For you to respect the right of the leader to make decisions

 

  • To ask questions

So when the leaders are not “loyal” ask

  • Why do I think that?

 

  • Exactly what did they do to make me say that?

 

  • Can I help to make things better?

 

  • How are my skills, it is easy to be critic in the recliner.

 

Link to Mark Von Appen and Fully Involved

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The Leadership Triad

Chief Dennis Reilly and Jason Hoevelmann discuss leadership for firefighters and fire officers specifically regarding being a consistent leader and officer using the Leadership Triad.

It comes downs to a strong moral compass and the firm foundation based on ethics and doing what’s right.

 

THE MORAL & ETHICAL OBLIGATIONS OF BEING AN OFFICER:

  • Your decisions and actions need to be driven by your own moral compass

  • Your compass needs to be in line with that of the organization

  • There should be no question where you stand among your subordinates, your

    peers, and your superiors.

  • Moral & ethically driven people bring consistency and stability to their work

    place.

    EXPECTATIONS:

  • If you do not lay out your expectations there is no guarantee on what you will get

  • Expectations need to be in writing, invest the time now to avoid the “Well I didn’t

    know what you wanted” in the future.

  • At the task level positions, expectations need to center around tasks, at leadership

    positons expectations need to include attitudes & behaviors.

    MODELING:

  • You will get what you display as your normal operating mode

  • What you model is the future for your organization. As an officer, you have a Moral

    & Ethical Obligation to leave your organization better than what you found it.

  • Chief Lasky once aid “Follow ugly kids home and you will find ugly parents”.

  • What you model is what they will do when you are not around.

    ACCOUNTABILITY:

  • This can be quite uncomfortable but as an officer you must be comfortable with being uncomfortable.

  • You have a Moral & Ethical obligation to correct unsatisfactory or counterproductive behaviors. We didn’t promote you because you look good, we expect you to do your job.

  • If you fail to hold your members accountable there is a good chance that your boss will hold you accountable. In some organizations, this is known as “failure to supervise” and can lead to demotion and/or termination.

 

Link to additional file on Leadership Triad 

 

All driven by the Moral &
Ethical obligations of being an officer

Mission First * Do Your Job

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Never Forget: Father’s Day LODD Fires

Chief Joe Pronesti and Jason Hoevelmann discuss three fires that happened on, or near Father’s Day.  The fires had a huge impact on many families, as all line of duty deaths do and we felt it appropriate to discuss the lessons and stories of these fires.

 

Chief Pronesti also has a recent article about these fires in Fire Engineering and the link is below.

 

Article

 

Here are some additional links for more information about these fires.

Vendome Article from Fire Engineering

Boston Fire History

FDNY Father’s Day Fire

Article on Kids of Father’s Day Fire

Charleston Sofa Fire

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Don’t Let the Bad Days Win

This podcast is for all of us that struggle from time to time with the opinions of others.  In most cases, when we put ourselves out there in any format, whether be as an engaged, energetic firefighter or officer to posting and blogging and writing and teaching, there are those that go out of their way to try and knock us down.

 

This is my response and therapy.  I hope is keeps you going!  Do NOT allow those that will never put themselves in a position to be challenged and criticized to affect your motivation.

 

Keep pushing!

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Command Considerations–First Arriving: Part 1

Don’t over-compicate the roll of command. In this episode Chief Pronesti discusses a simple initial size up option that takes into account the building.  This is not the only option out there, just one we discussed in this particular episode.

 

Size–how do you determine size and define that for your crews?

Use–understand the special hazards that each use group holds for firefighting operations and the members

Type–this requires you to get out and to see buildings and to understand that what we see is not always the facts.

Era–this is a critical piece of the puzzle that is forgotten. Get out and learn about the era your buildings were built in and the characteristics of those buildings.

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Commanding the Mayday: Part 1

Nothing can be so chaotic as a firefighter in trouble that calls a Mayday.  The fire service spends a lot of time and resources in training firefighters and task level officers in techniques and methods for calling a Mayday and surviving those situations—as it should be!  However, there has been little developed and created in the way of real, meaningful training for incident commanders to hone their skills in handling a Mayday.

 

This podcast will discuss, generally, about commanding a Mayday.  It is part 1 of a multi-part series that will focus on the IC and his/her role in handling the Mayday for a successful outcome.  

 

Our special guest for this series is Assistant Chief Joe Pronesti of the Elyria, OH Fire Department.  He speaks from experiences and his in-depth training.   

Chief Pronesti will be speaking at FDIC International 2017 on 

Size-Up and Command for the Small Department: How to Avoid Being Lost in the Fog of the Fireground

on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 08:00-12:00 in Rooms 132-133.

Below are some examples of what Chief Pronesti is doing and offering.

 

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Columbia Memorial Stair Climb

Check out their page at Columbia Memorial Stair Climb

 

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!! PLEASE JOIN US!!

After you climb 110 stories you will feel an overwhelming sense of pride. Sure, you’ll be proud that you finished the climb, but more importantly, you’ll take pride in knowing that in this great country there are still hero’s that are willing to make the ultimate sacrifice to keep all of us safe. 343 Firefighters, 70 Law Enforcement Officers, and 9 EMS Technicians died at the World Trade Center on 9/11. If you look closely, you will see that the American flag on the back of this shirt is comprised of 422 names. These are the names of the fallen. THIS IS WHY WE CLIMB!

Register to climb before 4.24.2017 and you will receive one of these amazing shirts! Go to www.columbiastairclimb.com to register now.

 

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Surviving the Poor Company or Department

Chief Reilly took some fabulous notes, here they are:

 

  1. Set your standards, your own code, and then live by them. Do not allow others to define what good or bad is.

 

  1. Management always has the right to manage poorly

 

  1. Normally bad assignments done last forever. Don’t do something that will stay with you for your entire career. One of the worst things to be labeled is a malcontent.

 

  1. Surround yourself with good people, positive energy comes for this.

 

  1. Stay in your lane. If you are a firefighter in a bad situation, then just concentrate on being the best firefighter you can. If you are a chauffeur or a company officer same thing.

 

  1. Your ability with two, five, seven years of experience probably is going to be very limited to influence the mind of a 30 year veteran.

 

  1. How many of the stupid things that management/leadership impact you?

 

  • “Oh that’s a stupid rule I would never do that” Well good then you don’t need to worry about it. I can guarantee you that even if you wouldn’t do that, someone else did and that is the reason why they came out with the rule!!!

 

  1. Don’t worry about making them look bad, let them make you look good.

 

  1. Remember it is still the best job in the world. If they are putting you in the position where you don’t feel that any more you might want to think about moving on.

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